• Karen Hayley

Grief

Updated: May 5, 2020

I'm sharing some progressive, forward thinking organisations below, to help anyone currently coping with grief. Please do let me know of any other resources you've found valuable in the comments below. Image kind thanks to @thewarmplace - year-round grief support services for children and young adults & @lifedeathwhat https://www.lifedeathwhatever.com/about 'Life. Death. Whatever' is a forthcoming book from Bloomsbury by Anna Lyons & Louise Winter, described as 'a profound but practical guide to rethinking the one thing that's guaranteed to happen to us all'. 

Immediate advice & support: https://www.thegoodgrieftrust.org/need-know-info/coronavirus-bereavement-advice/ https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/stress-anxiety-depression/coping-with-bereavement/ Death cafe: https://deathcafe.com/deathcafes/?fbclid=IwAR0VzeL85DHYUxC-jMEpngWV-_s4h3XSURn1yK119B-TgQ9NnEtodC-bikc (Now available online) Death Cafe is a 'not for profit' organisation which aims to increase awareness of death with a view to helping people make the most of their finite lives. People, (often strangers), will gather to eat cake, drink tea and discuss death. It describes itself as "a group directed discussion of death with no agenda, objectives or themes. It is a discussion group rather than a grief support or counselling session."

The Natural Death Centre: http://www.naturaldeath.org.uk/ Gives support on family-organised and environmentally friendly funerals, and runs the Association of Natural Burial Grounds. It is a social, entrepreneurial, educational charity that gives free, impartial advice on all aspects of dying, bereavement and consumer rights.

Grief cast:

https://play.acast.com/s/griefcast Griefcast is a podcast that examines the human experience of grief and death - but with comedians, so it's cheerier than it sounds. Griefcast won three Gold prizes at the British Podcast Awards 2018 (Best Entertainment Podcast, Best Interview Podcast, and Podcast of the Year 2018). Grief is highly personal, and there is no 'right or 'wrong' way to grieve. Bearing that in mind, it might be helpful at some point to know, that there are several studies which support comedy as a significant healing factor in helping people cope with the stages of grief. If interested, read on:https://whatsyourgrief.com/laughter-in-times-of-grief/ https://www.futurefile.com/dead-people-suck-using-humor-cope-grief/ https://www.psychologytoday.com/intl/blog/understanding-grief/201611/the-healing-power-laughter-in-death-and-grief Cry, Heart, But Never Break:

A Remarkable Illustrated Meditation on Loss and LifeIs a book to help children understand and cope with loss:  https://www.brainpickings.org/2016/03/08/cry-heart-but-never-break/?fbclid=IwAR2GVD1g6xHN2QBEkEqRFLl-1FSx5m2i_CKy5BertcXXCttxuN5aJ05BF48 Young Minds:

https://youngminds.org.uk/find-help/feelings-and-symptoms/grief-and-loss/ An organisation focused on supporting the mental health in young people in many areas including helping them cope with grief.

Nurture:

https://www.nurture.co/conversations "Five conversations" a free resource to help you plan with loved ones, for the end of life, created by Nurture CEO Sierra Campbell